Old Enough to Know Better, Too Diva to Care

Yesterday, The Engineer and I spent most of the day at the emergency vet clinic with Scout….it was not necessarily how I had planned to spend the 2nd to last Saturday before Christmas.  Not that any weekend is a good weekend to take your fur baby to the vet, but I was already feeling slightly stressed on the Christmas project time line.

The morning started out normally enough.  I got up and went to the gym while Roo and The Engineer napped.  I got home, showered, and had a coffee FaceTime date with Lil B.  The Engineer finally dragged himself out of bed after nursing his first hangover as a 29 year old.  We were just getting dressed to go run some errands and grab lunch when I spotted it……..a large section of torn up carpet next to the bathroom.

Exhibit A…..the carpet

Now…..Scout-a-Roo has a long. lengthy, and impressive history of eating things she isn’t supposed to, but carpet has never been one of those things.  While I was attempting to google how we might go about fixing the carpet, we discovered something else.  She had eaten the wings and legs off her beloved duck toy.

Now, her beloved duck is several years old, and he’s needed some emergency surgeries of his own.  I’ve repaired and patched several holes but mostly they have all been due to use and abuse…..and the occasional severe whipping around.  Scout likes to make sure he’s dead before she gives him to you, she’s considerate like that.  I had recently just had to apply a large patch to his whole abdominal area, but he was living to see more play days.

It seemed like 2 wings, 2 legs, and all that carpet was too much for Scout’s tummy.  Occasionally when she was little and would get into something I would induce vomiting at home.  I was hoping I could do that now and I could get the bulk of the material out of her before it started into her little intestines.  Normally, we wouldn’t know she’s eaten something until she either decides to puke on her own….or we find bright decorative chunks of fabric around the backyard. :/  If it had maybe been one thing or the other I might have just left her to her own devices….she is semi professional in this capacity after all.

We dosed her will a round of hydrogen peroxide and then we waited.  We waited through the loud tummy gurgles, and I sat near by with a garbage bag and hoped for the best.  Sadly, the best never came.  The gurgles came and went but no wings or carpet ever arrived.  I couldn’t find anything online about what to do if you attempt to induce vomiting but it doesn’t work, so I finally caved and called the vet.

We ended up needing to take her in to the vet, initially because hydrogen peroxide can cause ulcers if it isn’t treated and neutralized.  The vet took some X-rays, I think mostly because they didn’t believe me when I told them that these random things she eat tend to hang out in her tummy for really extended amounts of time.  Sure enough, a whole little puppy tummy full of “stuff”.  We were assured that one round of nausea inducing medicine ought to do the trick, so we waited and sorta listened while they worked on her in the back.  At one point I think they sort of inverted her to try and get gravity on their side….the force was not with them.

When the vet is scary, you feel pukey, and you’ve brought great shame on the family.

15 minutes later they came back to inform us the medication hadn’t had a strong effect on her, but that they would try it again.  Apparently a single dose of the medicine is suppose to make them vomit until they dry heave…..Scout was having no part of that.  They can only dose the medicine once an hour….and we still hadn’t eaten…..it was around 4pm by this time so we left to come home and eat and then said they would call.

About an hour later they called…..tummy still had something in it, but they had gotten “a large amount of carpet”.  “I’ve never seen a dog with this level of iron stomach, but I think we should try one more round again in an hour”.  Clearly this guy has never met my dog….she’s the pukiest dog I’ve ever had, but she never pukes multiple rounds in a sitting.  So, we sat at home another hour, and waited for a good phone call.  Finally, they called and said they thought they got everything out and the x-rays were clear.

The list of items they got out of her stomach–

  • A large amount of carpet
  • A sock……that we didn’t know was missing
  • Maybe 10……1x6inch rag stripes from my entry rug….that we didn’t know were missing
  • 2 duck wings
  • Anything else potentially wrapped up in the carpet ball

Several hundred dollars and some hours later, she came home and is generally fine.  I’m hoping that she’s learned her lesson, but honestly that seems unlikely.  We did leave her for a few hours today with the torn up carpet and rug booby trapped….everything was undisturbed when we got home.  Hopefully she ate something and it didn’t feel good, so she kept eating things to try and fix the first thing but who even knows with dogs.

Winter Has Arrived

It’s officially that time of year!!

  The wind, freezing rain, and snow have arrived and brought with them a sense of winter and Christmas.  The Engineer and I weren’t even planning on being home this weekend, we were hoping to go down to Momma MisHappening’s to spend the weekend trying to fill my turkey tag.  That just isn’t going to happen.  Nothing about sliding down an ice coated interstate for 80 miles and then sitting in a blizzard waiting for a turkey to waddle on by sounds like a good time.  So instead…..I shall be catching up on laundry and crafting!  I’ve got several craft projects I’m working on, and some I can’t share until after the holiday….but there is one I can share and maybe you can use for some Christmas decorating!

CRAFTING TIME IS HERE!  

(Best said in the Charlie Brown sing-song style) 

So, let’s say that hypothetically you’ve been hunting , and that those hunting trips have been successful.  Let’s also assume that you’d like to take a more nose to tail…I prefer snoot to toes….approach to using the animals you bring home.  Top that all off with seeing some expensive feather spheres and wreaths in shops about town (Here’s looking at your $70 foam wreath at Scheel’s :/ )….and you’ve got yourself a full blown holiday crafting project on your hands!

You may or may not have noticed, but pheasant feathers are frequently used in boujee arts and crafts.  I happened upon some expensive pheasant feather spheres while we were on vacation in Virginia, and instead of paying I decided I could make my own.  Nothing like some feather decorations for The Engineer’s upstairs man loft!  Sadly, the only pheasants that have made it home to me have already been cleaned and vacuumed packed breasts.  While delicious, pheasant breast doesn’t contribute a ton in the crafting department.  So, I used the next best option….duck feathers!  The ducks have been arriving at a fairly steady rate, so I’ve had my choice of some nice feathers.  They are a little bit more work then pheasant feathers, but they get the job done nicely.

To start, you’ll need to prep your feathers.  I plucked the bellies of 2 gadwalls and 1 northern shoveler specifically, but any variety you have that you think looks nice will work just fine.  I kept the species separate as they are slightly different colored, but feel free to mix if you like that look.  It would be better if you have some early season ducks before they become fully plumed and downy soft for winter.  

Duck feathers are very oily, and that oil can slowly degrade the feathers once they are removed from the ducks, so you’ll need to clean the feathers.  This is the hardest part of the project honestly.  I filled the kitchen sink with some warm water with a few drops of regular Dawn dish soap.  Place a colander down into the water, and slowly and carefully add handfuls of feathers and swish to clean.  Pull the colander up and rinse the feathers well with clean water.  

Now…..to dry the feathers……ugh.  I placed the feathers into grocery bags and then used my hair drying to blow the feathers dry.  You’ll need to maintain a firm….but not too tight so the air can’t escape…..grasp of bag around the neck of the dryer.  Also, make sure that the air hole you leave isn’t too large.  If it’s too large, the feathers will shoot up and out of the bag as they dry….which will lead to feathers floating all around you bathroom…….been there done that!  Honestly, this isn’t a great method for drying feathers, but it got the job done.  It’s annoying and VERY time consuming, but it works.  You’ll probably want to leave the feathers sit for a couple days and stir them occasionally to make sure they dry completely.

So fresh and so clean clean!

Now that everything is clean and dry, we can officially get crafting.  You’ll need to pick up a few supplies from your local craft shop.  Some good craft glue, tan or brown paint, a cheap foam brush or two, and some floral foam spheres of whatever size looks good to you.

Start by painting your foam.  If you can happen to find foam that is already dirt colored feel free to skip this.  I didn’t want to risk any of the green foam poking through so I gave them all a rough coat of paint.  It doesn’t have to be pretty or even, we are just looking for some camouflage here.

I recommend using a good tacky craft glue to place the feathers.  There are some cons to such a thick glue, but the pros greatly outweigh them.  You’ll want to start placing feathers from the center top and work down.  Begin by smearing a layer of glue on about the top third of the sphere.  Start layering on the feathers working in concentric circles around the sphere.  If you find that your feathers aren’t sticking, or if portions seem to be lifting, it might be helpful to put a tiny amount of glue on each feather before you place it.  I found that putting some glue on a foam brush and dragging the feathers carefully across it worked to smear on a very thin layer.

If the bases of your feathers are especially downy…or quill-y….you might want to gently trim them.  I ended up having to trim every single one of the gadwall feathers, they were just too fluffy.  It can be hard to cover up all the downy fluff, although if you don’t mind some fandom fluffy tuffs then just glue the feathers as they come.  

Every 3 circles around the sphere you’ll want to apply another ring of glue.  Use the foam brush to carefully dab on the glue.  You’ll want to be carful not to get too close to the previous row of feathers.  If you snag one it’ll pull bits of feather in weird directions, or maybe even pull the feather off depending on how recently it was placed.  Just use your finger or a toothpick to smooth the feathers back down, and if that doesn’t work just layer another feather or two on top.

Continue until you reach the bottom of the sphere.  You’ll end up with a quill end or two visible at the bottom of the sphere, but it’ll be alright….no one but you will ever even know.  Plus, just put that side down!  Let your spheres dry and then use them however the wind takes you.  Mine are destined to be nestled into a garland upstairs in the man loft!  I didn’t apply any sealant to mine, but depending on your intended use you might want to hit them with a thin spray coat of a sealant.  I wouldn’t recommend anything you’d need to brush on, it will just disturb the flow of the feathers.

Lab Queries: How Low Can You Go??

Welcome back from Thanksgiving Break!! 

This week we will crack open the analytical textbook and cover more math!

We are going to figure out how to go low.  I’m not talking about dropping it low on the dance floor….or limbo, although if anyone is interested in some friendly competition I’m sure we can arrange for that to happen at next year’s FELC.  Any takers!? 😊

How Low Can You Go??

Sure, I know those instrument companies are big on posting lower detection limits for all of their instruments, but you can’t take that answer as the gospel truth.  Those posted detection limits are created under the most ideal operating conditions.  It’s the same as car companies who post that their brand new, super shiny, fresh off the production line vehicle has an average 48 MPG HIGHWAY…..we all know that’s not true! Maybe it’ll happen once if the wind is blowing in the right direction….but it really isn’t a fair indicator of how your vehicle is going to operate day in and day out.  Standard detection limits on instruments are the same way,it might happen, but it probably won’t. 

Setting detection limits is a journey you and your instruments are going to have to go on together.


It’s after Thanksgiving….I have no Christmas shame!

IYou may or may not have noticed, but several of the tests we run on ethanol, at least finished product ethanol, are searching for an answer very near to 0.0…..or as close as we can realistically get.

  • Methanol
  • Copper
  • Chloride

These are all test results that typically you’d typically expect to see very low-levels on.  How do you know that your instrument is capable of seeing levels that are that low effectively?  Low level detection is one of the most difficult things we ask of our instruments, so it’s important that we know exactly what we can and cannot expect.

Calculating your Detection Level, or DL is a pretty easy and straightforward process.  First things first you’ll need to run a good calibration curve, but let’s assume you’ve read all the blogs and you’ve already got that step done!  Find a standard with low values, similar to where you hypothesize your DL might be.  You’re going to analyze that standard 7-10 times.  I don’t recommend doing this over time, just run them back to back.  Unlike Control Limits which are calculated based on instrument shift over time, DL can be calculated based on a snapshot of the instrument.

For the math portion, start by taking the standard deviation across all injections for all the components.  My table also shows the average, but you won’t directly need that for DL calculation, but it is good practice to check your repeatability recovery….the average over the known value*100 will get you there.  If your repeatability recovery isn’t inside of your control levels we discussed in Common Calibration Conundrums and Other Laboratory Queries Part 4, you’ll want to rerun the study with a higher standard level.  It could be that you’re too close to your instrument’s detection level.

The Detection Limit is then calculated as the Standard Deviation value times 3.143.

There statistically are several ways of calculating a DL,but this is the easiest and for most laboratory purposes will work just fine.  In my above example, my IC can see sulfate peaks down to 0.0026mg/L and chloride peaks down to 0.0084mg/L.  Now, that’s absolute bottom low as you can go level on my instrument.  Do I routinely analyze samples at that level….no.  There is a practical level for using your instrument.  In my case, I don’t consider my instrument practically capable of analyzing samples below 0.25mg/L, and I wouldn’t report any levels lower than that.

Hopefully this will help you dial in the lower limits of your instrument systems, and guide you toward some practical levels of analysis and reporting.

Catching Up

It’s been several weeks since I’ve had time to just sit down and write!  Seems like between work, vacations, and social events I just haven’t been home with nothing to do but talk to you guys in quite some time!

I thought maybe I’d just catch you up on a few things that have been happened recently!  

First things first, The Engineer survived his first long distance, week long vacation with Momma Mishappenings and my Sister!  We took him to what might be our favorite vacation destination….Colonial Williamsburg!

Williamsburg really is one of my favorite places.  The smell of boxwood shrubs and gingerbread cookies fills the air and oyster shells give a particular crunch under foot that can’t be created or mimicked by anything else.  Don’t even get me started about the magnolia trees.  I can technically plant a magnolia tree here, but they aren’t the same variety as those large southern plantation magnolias that have come to be a system of southern living.

While in Williamsburg we made a day trip to Monticello.  In all our trips to Williamsburg, I’ve been maybe 13 times…..we’ve never been to Monticello.  Sometimes it’s discussed, but we always just end up staying the extra day in Colonial Williamsburg.  While the house and lawns were impressive, I have to say the tour left some things to be desired.  Tour groups run continuously at 10 minute intervals….so they really have to rush you through the house.  It’s hard to take in all the furnishings of the rooms or see all the custom architecture, and there really isn’t even time to ask questions.  While I’m sure the gardens are lovely in the Spring and Summer, fall trips to Monticello’s extensive gardens are a bit lack luster.  I can’t say that I regret going, but I’m also not sure that I would recommend the visit….if that makes sense.

We also celebrated The Engineer’s birthday last week!  It really did turn into a week long celebration, mostly because I managed to snag us tickets to a 4 course Beer and Dinner pairing at one of the boujee-ier restaurants in town.  You know you’ve had a good night of eating when the dessert course was the least impressive of all the courses!

Smoked scottish ale and a porkchop on a bed of parsnip puree….yes please!

We took Friday off work to scout some public land for turkey and pheasant. We found both, but unfortunately the turkeys waddled through a thick windbreak into a private field, and the only pheasants we flushed up were hens.  Never the less it was fun spending the day driving around and trudging around all the land that’s open to the public.  I do love me a good trudge!  I’m really not much for blaze orange, but now I have a hat and sweet matching vest.  Safe to say I think I’ll mostly stick to turkey hunting so I can leave the neon colors at home!

Birthday week wrapped up with maybe the worst decision I’ve made in a long time.  

In early September I found out that The Engineer’s alma mater was playing a rivalry game on his birthday weekend.  I got really excited and snagged 2 tickets.  I know how he feels about football, and how he feels about being a Jackrabbit, and I thought it would be a fun birthday surprise!

Ahhhh, inside drinking beers before we were forced onto the frozen tundra.

What I failed to consider when buying the tickets, was the drastic change in temperature that occurs in South Dakota between September and mid-November.  

IT WAS FREEZING!

I don’t know that I could tell you the last time I felt that cold.  We were sorta okay until halftime. Two blankets, hot chocolates, and a pretty eventful game kept us going until the action stopped…every minute from halftime through the 3rd quarter felt like hours.  Minutes move much slower in frozen toe time as it turns out.  By the time we left the stadium and checked the weather from the relative warmth of the un-started car, The Weather Channel informed us it was 10 degrees and felt like -1 due to wind.  Even with the seat warmers on high for the hour drive, my booty was still an ice cube when we got home!

Never again will I buy tickets to an event in an outdoor stadium anytime after Halloween!

This was before our faces felt like they were going to crack and fall off!

Lab Queries: What to Do When Things Go Wrong

I’m sure you’ll all be happy to know that this week on the blog we are leaving calibration curves and math behind us!

Don’t worry, if you still have questions about instrument calibrations, or a new issue arises in your lab, I’m always here to help you address those.  In talking to some of you at FELC a few weeks ago, the issue of troubleshooting came up a few times.  I know this can be a hard topic and really digging into a broken instrument can be an intimidating idea for some people.  But I’m going to let you in on a secret….it’s maybe one of my favorite activities to do!

I’m weird….I know…..I’ve accepted it and moved on. 😊

What to Do When Things Go Wrong

We’ve all had that moment….we started samples on an instrument, left for the night expecting to come back in the morning to a nice, completed data set, and return to find that our instrument malfunctioned!  Now results are behind schedule and you have the added issue of an instrument that just refuses to cooperate.

squirrel

Troubleshooting can be a frustrating and tricky activity to complete, especially because instruments never break at convenient times.  If I had a dollar for every time an instrument broke when I had rush samples to do, I wouldn’t have to work anymore!  But, because instruments will always continue to break, and I need to keep my job, I thought I’d fill you in on some of my favorite troubleshooting tips.

  • Follow the Path

A good way to make sure you don’t overlook any parts of your instrument is to start at one end of the instrument and follow the sample path through to the other end.  It’s easy to jump from place to place first, maybe checking your sample loop before jumping up to check your eluent filters.  Odds are that you’ll over look something, and your issue will be in the place you over look.  Following the path helps ensure that you give every section of you instrument it’s due investigation.

  • The Tubing Checker

One of my new favorite troubleshooting tools is a spare autosampler syringe!  When I need to troubleshoot one of my instruments with a large amount of tubing, I’ve found that using the syringe to carefully inject DI water into each section of tubing is a quick and easy way to look for the source of the problem.  Maybe a section of tubing is plugged, maybe it’s cracked, maybe there’s a dust bunny lodged in the end (true life this has happened to my IC!!)  It’s so hard to tell sometimes by just eyeballing the sections, but this technique has yet to fail me!

  • Look Beyond the Science

Sometimes the source of an instrument issue isn’t related to the “science-y” components we would typically focus on.  Sometimes exhaust fans wear out or autosampler screws fall out or sheer off.  Don’t be afraid to look into the more mechanical parts of your instruments.  Think of them as support systems.  If your autosampler syringe housing is loose and wobbly because a screw is loose, maybe the syringe isn’t being held firm enough to puncture the vials.  If you’re lucky, your instrument will be smarter than you.  Sometimes the software might notice that something is wrong and stop the analysis run.  If it’s not….you’ll come back to a broken syringe plus a lack of data.

screw

If you have any fun or interesting troubleshooting tricks that have never steered you wrong let me know!  I’m always on the hunt for new ideas, and if I get enough, we might do a part 2 later.  Having as many tools in your troubleshooting tool belt as possible is so beneficial, and it’s one of the areas that we should all constantly be striving to improve.

Part 3: How to Know if Your Calibration Curve is Correct

You’ve bought some standards and you made a multi-point curve.  You might think your work to improve laboratory accuracy is over, but then doubt starts to creep into your mind.  What if something’s gone wrong!?!  What if you run a sample and you expect one answer and your instrument tells you another?!  Is the sample bad, or is there a problem with your calibration curve?  Has something gone wrong somewhere in your plant’s process, or do you have a bad batch of calibration standards!?

Image result for sheldon cooper meme

The first step in ensuring that your calibration curve is up to par is checking the Correlation Coefficient.  I know, I know….more math….but stick with me here because it’s important!  The R2 value of your calibration curve has a large amount of statistical power.  No one wants to talk about statistics, but it has a lot to do with how well your instrument is calibrated.

In a nutshell, the correlation coefficient gives you an idea of how well the standards relate to each other.  R2 values statistically can range from -1.0 to +1.0, but on your instruments, you should look for a value as close to 1.0 as possible!  Values of R2=0.9987, R2=0.99943, or R2=0.9963 are examples of what you are looking for.  The closer to 1.0 your R2 value is, the stronger the relationship between your standards.  A strong relationship between standards leads to more confidence in the reported results for your samples.  Remember that your standard value points hug your samples, and no one likes crappy, wet noodle armed hugs! It’s listed somewhere in your instrument’s software, you might just have to look around for it.

So you’ve got a strong curve, but calibration curves can be strong….but wrong!  How can you check the accuracy of the standards you used to make the curve?

There is a way to prove that you standards and instrument are operating correctly.  We are going to employ the Dr. Sheldon Cooper of standard….the validation standard!  Just like Dr. Copper, the validation standard knows more than you, and it isn’t afraid to tell you when you’re calibration is wrong!

Image result for sheldon cooper meme

The validation standard should be a standard SEPARATE from your curve!  Buy it from an alternative supplier, buy a different lot of a standard you use in your curve, or buy 4 standards and just pick one to use only as a validation….just don’t use your validation standard as part of your calibration curve.

If you just analyze one of your calibration standards again as a sample, you will get the right answer 100% of the time….because somewhere in the software you’ve entered those values in as the answer.  This might look promising, but it tells you ZERO useful information about the accuracy and correctness of your calibration curve.  The validation standard’s “job” is essentially to be an unknown sample, that you secretly know the answer to.

A good basic rule of thumb is that the difference between the known value of your validation standard and the instrument’s reported result based on your curve should vary no more than 10%.  We’ll call this “Validation Recovery” for ease of terminology.  For most applications, 10% is much larger than the recovery should be, but if you’re just started down the path of improving your laboratory accuracy….it’s a good basic place to start.

From here we are going to have to dive into a bit more math, and I think we can all agree that one math topic per post is frankly too much math!

Next week I’ll cover the basic statistics of calculating a more precise validation recovery range for your instrument, tracking validation recovery, and how you can use that information to access the performance of your instrument!

New Protein

Duck season is upon us!!

FullSizeRender-1

A successful harvest so far this season means that I’ve had a fun chance to do something new with a protein I’ve never used.  I’ve had restaurant duck plenty of times, and it’s always been delicious.  But wild duck is a whole different animal, and it really puts a whole new spin on it when you can take something all the way from harvest to plate.

In addition to eating we also have some wings stashed in the freezer for a taxidermy/biology lab style display I want to do for the upstairs loft.  I’m thinking something along the lines of displaying the wings with little tags and their Latin names.  It’s a nice way to blend hunting with science in a stylized way, and it will feature the prettiest part of the birds….in my opinion.  Using as much of what we bring home as possible is something I really put a lot of focus on, The Engineer might say too much focus….but he usually goes along with my ideas! 🙂

img_1600.jpeg

The most shocking part of duck season so far is how strongly Madam Roo has taken to the whole situation.  My usual timid, perpetually nervous girl has taken to charging right through The Engineer when he arrives home that she can go investigate what he’s brought home every morning.  Poor guy just wants to say hello to her, and she can’t even be bothered until she’s accessed the daily harvest.

IMG_0024

I’ve shared this already on Instagram, but it’s just too good and too cute!
“The Stay at Home, Delicate Duck Hunter”

I have grand cooking plans for all sorts of wild game, so I tend to get a bit bossy with home the birds should be cleaned.  Sadly, it’s been a bit too early in the season to pluck a bird for roasting.  They have all been about halfway between their summer feathers and having their dense winter, downy feathers grow in.  This has just led to a mess of plucking, so sadly I haven’t had a bird yet for roasting with my canned apple chutney.  That will come with time I’m sure, but I am antsy to try that and let you know how it goes!

While we patiently wait for the birds to fully plume for winter, and hopefully cleaner plucking, we’ve been breasting out the birds.  I tend to be a bit more skilled than The Engineer in that capacity, so bird cleaning as really become a whole family affair.  We usually try and keep Scout in the house while the knives are flying, but she’s taken to crying like she’s being beaten if we are out with the ducks without her, so we usually cave about halfway through.

IMG_1603

Ummm excuse me iz trying to investigate pleez!

IMG_1605

Pleez do not mind while I investigate these ducks pleez….

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My very first adventure into cooking duck was Spicy Thai Duck Burgers curtesy of From Field to Plate.  I’ve used other From Field to Plate recipes before, and I’ve always had really great results.  I really can’t say enough good things about his lime and tequila turkey marinade!  The burgers were alright, but I would defiantly tweak the spices and flavors next time we make them.

IMG_0053

I think I’m just not a huge fan of cinnamon paired with meats.  I know that it’s a normal flavor profile in some Eastern cuisines, but it’s just not my favorite flavor.  Also, I didn’t find it all that spicy, and even The Engineer thought it was too mild.  I will say I did half the jalapeño in the slaw, but usually a single jalapeño is all The Engineer can tolerate spice wise.  It’s so hard to know especially because every pepper is a little different, but it could have used way more oomph.

I would definitely remove the cinnamon and amp up the spice for round two.  Also, I don’t like peanut sauce and it was a Wednesday night, and I was feeling lazy…..so I cheated and bought some peanut sauce for The Engineer.  The From Field to Plate homemade version is probably much better.  If you’re into peanut sauce and give it a try let me know!

img_0054.jpeg

High on list of things you don’t want in your burger patty…..

This week we were a bit crunched for time, so instead of trying a new recipe we went to an old fall back.  Friday night duck taco and nacho night with margaritas was exactly what this week called for!  Just treat it exactly the way you’d use regular ground beef, and no one will even know you’re sneaking waterfowl into the dinner rotation!

I do a bit feel like I’m not really using the ducks to their full flavor potential, and it’s making me a little bummed.  I’m not really in love with the texture of ground duck….it’s a bit soft.  More on the side of ground turkey or chicken then say ground beef or deer.  It defiantly goes better, in my opinion, with something crunchy….slaw or tortilla chips.  But, at the end of the day, it’s all getting gobbled up and that’s really what counts.

Meals do really mean more when you know the time and sacrifice that have been put in to make them happen.  So many people have moved so far away from knowing where their food comes from.  Nothing that arrives on your table arrives by magic, and I’m glad that in this house we are active participants in at least some of the meals that arrive on the dining room table.

Bonus points for not having any shot end up in the taco meat!  I’ll take that as my major victory for the week!!